Accrediting Agencies

ETAC - ABET (Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org)

ABET Accreditation

What Is ABET Accreditation?

ABET accreditation is assurance that a college or university program meets the quality standards established by the profession for which it prepares its students. For example, an accredited engineering program must meet the quality standards set by the engineering profession. An accredited computer science program must meet the quality standards set by the computing profession.

ABET accredits postsecondary degree-granting programs housed within regionally accredited institutions. ABET accredits programs only, not degrees, departments, colleges, or institutions.

Who Sets the ABET Quality Standards?

The quality standards programs must meet to be ABET-accredited are set by the ABET professions themselves. This is made possible by the collaborative efforts of many different professional and technical societies. These societies and their members work together through ABET to develop the standards, and they provide the professionals who evaluate the programs to make sure they meet those standards.

Why Is ABET Accreditation Important?

  • Accreditation helps students and their parents choose quality college programs.
  • Accreditation enables employers to recruit graduates they know are well-prepared.
  • Accreditation is used by registration, licensure, and certification boards to screen applicants.
  • Accreditation gives colleges and universities a structured mechanism to assess, evaluate, and improve the quality of their programs.

Students successfully completing ETAC-ABET accredited programs are expected to perform to the following levels:

ABET Outcomes

  • An appropriate mastery of the knowledge, techniques, skills and modern tools of their disciplines.
  • An ability to apply current knowledge and adapt to emerging applications of mathematics, science, engineering and technology.
  • An ability to conduct, analyze and interpret experiments and apply experimental results to improve processes.
  • An ability to apply creativity in the design of systems, components or processes appropriate to program objectives.
  • An ability to function effectively on teams,;
  • An ability to identify, analyze and solve technical problems.
  • An ability to communicate effectively.
  • Recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in lifelong learning.
  • An ability to understand professional, ethical and social responsibilities.
  • A respect for diversity and knowledge of contemporary professional, societal and global issues.
  • A commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement.

The program must demonstrate that graduates have a working knowledge of the design, manufacture, and maintenance of major subsystems and technologies associated with land, sea, air and space mobility.      

* ABET, Inc. 111 Market Pl., Suite 1050 Baltimore, MD 21202(410) 347-7700 www.ABET.org

EAC - ABET (Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org)

ABET Accreditation

What Is ABET Accreditation?

ABET accreditation is assurance that a college or university program meets the quality standards established by the profession for which it prepares its students. For example, an accredited engineering program must meet the quality standards set by the engineering profession. An accredited computer science program must meet the quality standards set by the computing profession.

ABET accredits postsecondary degree-granting programs housed within regionally accredited institutions. ABET accredits programs only, not degrees, departments, colleges, or institutions.

Who Sets the ABET Quality Standards?

The quality standards programs must meet to be ABET-accredited are set by the ABET professions themselves. This is made possible by the collaborative efforts of many different professional and technical societies. These societies and their members work together through ABET to develop the standards, and they provide the professionals who evaluate the programs to make sure they meet those standards.

Why Is ABET Accreditation Important?

  • Accreditation helps students and their parents choose quality college programs.
  • Accreditation enables employers to recruit graduates they know are well-prepared.
  • Accreditation is used by registration, licensure, and certification boards to screen applicants.
  • Accreditation gives colleges and universities a structured mechanism to assess, evaluate, and improve the quality of their programs.

Students successfully completing ETAC-ABET accredited programs are expected to perform to the following levels:

ABET Outcomes

An appropriate mastery of the knowledge, techniques, skills and modern tools of their disciplines. Engineering programs must demonstrate that their students attain:

  1. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.
  2. An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  3. An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.
  4. An ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams.
  5. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
  6. An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.
  7. An ability to communicate effectively.
  8. The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context.
  9. A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning.
  10. A knowledge of contemporary issues.
  11. An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice .

 

IFMA (International Facility Management Association)

FM Credentials

The Certified Facility Manager® (CFM® ) credential sets the industry standard for ensuring knowledge and abilities of practicing facility managers. The certification process is designed to assess competence in the field through work experience, education and the ability to pass a comprehensive exam. Since the program began in 1992, more than 3100 facility managers from 32 countries have achieved this prestigious recognition.

IFMA recognized the need for a designation for entry-level and transitioning facility professionals who do not yet have the hands-on experience required for obtaining the CFM.

A knowledge-based credential, the Facility Management Professional (FMP®) is designed to accelerate an FM's transition into the profession. 

 

AEDF (Associated Equipment Distributors Foundation)

The development of quality training programs has given momentum to fill the training needs of the members of the Associated Equipment Distributors. They are converting into services that promise to yield a handsome return on investment for the industry in general, and in particular for those who have directly supported the foundation. Examples:

These programs have common characteristics. Each is a new program that is building, growing, serving new needs and providing results that were only a gleam in the foundation's eye five years ago. Further, all reflect the industry education and workforce development objectives in the foundation's mission.

The real heroes behind the momentum created thus far are the investors who have made the workforce development programs possible, and the participants in educational events who fuel the foundation's ongoing delivery of professional training programs. Funds from these sources enable the foundation's board, committees and staff to produce the industry services and initiatives currently in force.

http://www.aedfoundation.org

 

NATEF (National Automotive Technicians Educational Foundation)

Achieving ASE Certification for Automotive Training Programs

The motor vehicle repair industry has taken on a new sophistication. It requires advanced technical training and computer literacy. Today's automotive technician must have:

According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, jobs as automotive service professionals will be plentiful for persons who finish training programs in high school, vocational or technical school, or community college.

To help vocational educators recruit, mentor, and train tomorrow's technicians, the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) offers certification for technician training programs. The purpose of the automotive technician training certification program is to improve the quality of training offered at secondary and post-secondary, public and proprietary schools.

Programs can earn ASE certification upon the recommendation of the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). NATEF was founded to develop, encourage, and improve automotive technician education. NATEF examines the structure and resources of training programs and evaluates them against nationally accepted standards of quality. NATEF's precise national standards reflect the skills that students must master. ASE certification through NATEF evaluation ensures that certified training programs meet or exceed industry-recognized, uniform standards of excellence.

http://www.natef.org/about/achieving_ase_cert.cfm

 

ACCE (American Council for Construction Education)

The American Council for Construction Education (ACCE) is a leading global advocate of quality construction education programs and to promote, support, and accredit quality construction education programs. Through promotion and continued improvement of postsecondary construction education, ACCE accredits construction education programs in colleges and universities that request its evaluation and meet its standards and criteria. ACCE is recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) as the accrediting agency for four year baccalaureate degree programs in construction, construction science, construction management, and construction technology, and as the accrediting agency for two year associate-degree programs of a like nature.

acce-hq.org