Nonvisible Disabilities

Learning Disabilities


Learning Disabilities hinder students of average or above-average intelligence in easily and dependably processing various types of information. Students with dyslexia, for example, have a perceptual deficit that scrambles sequences of letters or numbers. Discuss with the student how the learning disability manifests itself and how the student has handled it in the past. It is important to realize that learning disabilities are not the result of a student's intelligence, physical or emotional health, or cultural or socioeconomic background. Learning impairments may exist with other disabilities. For instance, students with head injuries resulting from traumatic accidents may require accommodations similar to those needed by persons with learning disabilities.

Mild to Moderate Sensory Disabilities


Mild to moderate sensory deficits such as low-level vision and slight hearing impairment, can often be accommodated by appropriate seating arrangements and adjusting room lighting.

Chronic Medical Disabilities


Chronic disabilities such as diabetes, seizure disorders, cardiac or respiratory conditions, lupus, and cancer, may interfere with stamina, attention span, and alertness, especially when there are adjustments in medical management. The attendance and performance of these students may be erratic, so they may need you to consider a flexible schedule for assignments.

Psychological/Psychiatric Disabilities


Psychological/Psychiatric Disabilities such as depression, bipolar disorders, schizophrenia, panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder and others, may interfere with stamina, attention span, and alertness, especially when there are adjustments in medical management. The attendance and performance of these students may be erratic, so they may need a flexible schedule for assignments.