BACK TO SCHOOL WITH FOCUS

Eye exams by eye doctors detect problems that threaten health and learning

Educators see test scores rise when children have proper vision

There s one exam that could change a child s future. It requires no studying, no books and no previous education. It isn t given by a teacher or even in a classroom. It s an eye exam administered by an eyecare professional (optometrist or ophthalmologist), and it could shape a child s lifelong attitude toward learning.

Unfortunately, it is estimated that just 14 percent of children receive an eye exam before starting school. Instead, most receive a cursory vision screening from their general practitioner or in school. But numerous studies have found that these vision screenings often miss the vision problems they are intended to identify.

Eye exams are as important as immunizations before a child starts school, said Andrea Thau, O. D., vice president of the New York Children s Vision Coalition and spokesperson for the American Optometric Association. Many children who are frustrated in school simply aren t able to see well. Unless their vision problem is diagnosed and corrected, the child may never feel comfortable in a classroom and may never develop into a productive student.

Press Release from the
American Optometric Association &
the Vision Council of America  

August is National Children's Vision and Learning Month and the Michigan College of Optometry joins many other eye and vision care organizations in recognizing this very important component of the "Back-To-School" activities. The following links provide additional information or make an appointment for your child to make sure they are optimally prepared to succeed in school.

 

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