Assignments that particularly useful for demonstrating knowledge
  • Research papers: written by students singly or in groups; dealing with information you, the teacher, know or that would be new to both the student and you; one paper or several.
  • Essays dealing with particular questions or problems either you or the students come up with, trying to solve them, or merely exploring or presenting them.
  • Letters to persons or groups clarifying problems or questions and making recommendations: letters to the editor about acid rain, role-playing letters to historical figures, letters to scientists apprising them of discoveries since their deaths.
  • Creative writing incorporating or representing what has been learned: plays comparing political figures' views, poems showing proficiency with new terminology, semi-fictional accounts of historical events.
  • Formal proposals: singly or in groups, students can write proposals for projects or future study (imaginary or possible), can create utopian societies and means of achieving them, can design scientific apparatus and justify their creation.